designers, sewing, sewing patterns, vintage clothing

Fabulous Friday: Not Really Vintage, but…….

Vogue

OK, so it’s not really vintage and I’m late to the game today, but I got up at 4am the last two days, to watch two wild toddlers, so I need a bit of a break here. Nonetheless, I’m working through listing the 10,000 patterns I got a couple of weeks ago, and came across this one.

It’s Vogue 2940, by Anna Sui. Anna Sui is a very underrated designer who you don’t hear a lot about, but she has made some gorgeous stuff, including this little beauty from 2007. It’s got a very Pride & Prejudice vibe to it, and considering that the Kiera Knightley version of the movie came out in 2005, I guess that’s why. The regency vibe is unmistakable, but it would fit in perfectly for lovers (like myself) of Gunne Sax and cottagecore garments. It also may just be the perfect summer dress, as I could see it going from shopping to a wedding to church, and just about everywhere in between.

So forgive me if this one isn’t actually vintage. It’s not even quite listed in the shop yet, though it should be this weekend. It’s not even my picture. But I do feel that it is too lovely to ignore. What do you think?

1950s fashion, vintage clothing, vintage fashion

Fabulous Friday: Norwood Hosiery

Someone on a Facebook group that I’m part of asked this week about Norwood Hosiery. I had never heard of them, but she had some stockings she was wondering about. I found out something interesting.

I didn’t delve too deeply into them, but Norwood Hosiery was around for some time. This person was asking specifically about the packaging, which featured an orchid, and what time period it was used in. I found that it was used in the 50s and 60s. Pretty. They liked to advertise women’s things so beautifully then — have you ever seen the Modess ads of that time period? Women dressed in gorgeous designer gowns to advertise sanitary pads. We likely will never see anything like that again. But I digress.

That beautiful orchid packaging of Norwood’s Hosiery held a little secret (or maybe it wasn’t, but it was new to me). They hosiery were scented with orchids. Now, I have zero since of smell, and when I do, it’s wrong (think entire weeks where things smell of cat pee), but I think that’s pretty cool. Nowadays I’m sure they wouldn’t do something like that because of allergies and asthma and the like, but I imagine opening a lovely package of stockings and having a gentle scent of orchids wafting up to me, and it just makes me happy. What about you?

sewing, sewing patterns, vintage fashion

I’m Famous (Anonymously)!

If you don’t follow Stephanie Canada on YouTube, why not? She’s a fellow weirdling and really funny, and is a vintage sewing fan as well. Her most recent video featured a dress I shared on the Vintage Sewing Patterns Nerds group on Facebook. It’s the 50s one that she says you’d wear so your friends can drag you around by the handle if you get too drunk at a party. (See what I mean?) Anyway, the video features weird patterns over the years, and there are some doozies. Keep in mind that one of the New York ones she mentions in the video is available in my shop, and I’ve had at least one other over the years proving, of course, what I’ve always said: that there is a person for every pattern.

A couple of others that I shared in Stephanie’s comments:

McCall’s 8190. Because why wouldn’t you want to look like you’ve had a lady accident?
McCall’s 5309. Just gonna leave this here without comment.
1950s fashion, sewing patterns, vintage fashion

Fabulous Friday

As you might imagine, after last week’s arrival of 10,000 patterns — no joke, folks, it is 10,000 — one could probably surmise that I’ve been just a wee bit busy. It’s actually been like Christmas in May here, with all of the beautiful designs I’ve seen. I’m slowly working my way through them, as well as building another website, because hey, who’s a glutton for punishment? THIS GIRL.

I may have squealed a little bit when I came across this beauty. I’d imagine that there is a fair bit of handwork in it, but it’s glorious, nonetheless.

Vogue Couturier Design 748, from 1953.

Isn’t it lovely? On that note, I’m off to bask in more patterns. Click here to shop. Have a great weekend.

sewing, sewing patterns, vintage clothing

New York Pattern 120

New York pattern 120. Mid-1930s.

This is a beautiful pattern from the 1933-1936 range. It has the small NRA (National Recover Act) seal on the bottom left front of the envelope. NRA patterns were from the 1930s-1940s. This one has the smallest logo I’ve seen. It’s a fabulous style — look at those cuffs! Interestingly, it also does not say “Gold Seal Pattern” like many New York patterns do, so this is an early one.

The thing I find most interesting is that it has Joan Bennett written on the front. When you compare it, you can see that it’s actually done in her signature:

Photo: History for Sale.

This is interesting to me because I’ve never seen a pattern of this era that was associated with an actress except Hollywood Patterns and Star Patterns. Hollywood, of course, was known for their patterns with stars’ photos in an oval on the front right cover, and they included them in their catalogs too. Star Patterns often had full body photographs of the actress. I’ve only seen a few over the course of time. But I’ve never seen a New York pattern associated with an actress, so this is kind of cool.

Joan Bennett was an immensely popular actress of the era, so I’m not surprised that they chose her. I’m just wondering how many more of these there are out there. Sadly, this one is missing the instructions, so I don’t know if there is anything on the instruction page about Ms. Bennett. If you know anything about them, drop me a line, because I’d love to know.

sewing, sewing patterns, vintage clothing

My Day

This is what my afternoon looks like. This truck is currently heading toward my house, ETA in two hours, straight from Texas. It contains five sewing pattern cabinets (YAY – I need them!) and ten thousand new-to-me vintage patterns.

TEN THOUSAND PATTERNS.

Dear Lord, what have I done to myself? Oh well, one grabs these things when one grabs these things, so I’m actually pretty excited. Husband, not so much, but he hasn’t really spoken badly of it. No matter, it’s my work to do anyway. It’s taken six months of planning this in the middle of a pandemic and a broken supply chain (and a knee replacement for the person at the other end of the delivery), but we persevered and now it’s happening. I’ll be interested to see what I find in there, and you’ll be seeing more lovelies, I’m sure.

Pray for me. Light a candle. Send good juju. I’m gonna need it in order to fit all of this into my workspace! More will be revealed after the unloading.

designers, sewing patterns

Dazian’s Patterns

I’ve come across a few Dazian’s patterns over the years, and they’re always unique. Dazian’s produced some sewing patterns, always for dancewear or theatre costumes. The patterns I’ve seen have been for both women and children, though there are some even harder to find men/boys ones out there. I think the actual pattern line was pretty short lived, and although the ones I’ve seen always appear to be late 40s and early 50s, the company’s website states that they actually didn’t start putting out patterns until 1961. I would have never guessed.

Dazian’s as a company was pretty cool. They actually started with theatre costumes in 1842, and the company lasted over 100 years. It was started by Wolf Dazian, said to be the most knowledgeable costumer in history, though he also designed stage props. Dazian’s costumes were worn by such notables as Sarah Bernhardt, Caruso, Anna Pavlova, Al Jolson, and Maude Adams. Mr Dazian was known.

Dazian’s created costumes for Ziegfeld, of Follies fame. It was said that Ziegfield would walk into the shop carrying armloads of sweet peas, demanding the color be replicated into fabrics. He did the same thing with butterflies. He was a creative genius, but seemed to have trouble paying his bills once the costumes were done, according to Emil Friedlander, the manager of the company in the early 40s. Another customer was P.T. Barnum, who bought custom-made costumes for Mademoiselle Fanny — an orangutan.

He created a military style coat for Maude Adams that was trimmed in 14 carat gold — his most expensive costume by 1941, at a cost of $1350. Legend also had it that he created a fountain for a performance of Anna Pavlova. When she sent her rep to threaten to kill Dazian due to the noise of the water, he offered to remedy by changing the water from “hard water to soft water.” After banging around on the pipes for a while, Ms. Pavlova declared the noise to be much improved. The man was a genius at costuming and handling people.

Dazian’s expanded to the West Coast in 1929, so that they could serve not only the New York clientele, but the growing Hollywood scene as well. Wolf Dazian had pretty much locked up costuming nationwide by this time. Though he died in 1902, his son Henry had been heading the business for some years, and it continued to grow. Henry was quite the aficionado as well. He was director of the Maurice Grau Opera company, and was such a foodie that he was known to travel abroad just to taste a particular dish. Though the company remained in business for years after his death in 1937, Henry Dazian’s will stipulated that many of the company’s assets be converted to start the Dazian Foundation for medical research. He died after a long illness of heart disease, finally succumbing to pneumonia and the effects of diverticulitis. He had never married.

Dazian remains in business today as a fabric seller, primarily for curtains and drapes for theatres, including Las Vegas. That the company has managed to thrive for 180+ years is nothing short of amazing, and the diversity of their business is fascinating to behold.

The illustration above is one of a group I acquired recently. Several are signed by “Fern,” and though I have no idea who she is, I do admire her expertise. They all include cute notes about what fabrics to use and other details. I think that these are actually costume illustrations and not patterns, but I can’t be sure, given how few of the patterns are out there. Aren’t they adorable?

sewing

Cheaper By The Dozen (and a Half)

We lost one of the great ones last week. My Uncle Clarence passed away earlier in the week. He was my mom’s brother and is pictured in the middle of the bottom row, above. They are part of a family of 18 kids, and yes, they all have the same parents. My grandparents passed away at the ages of 84. 2 of those children passed away in childhood, but 16 of them grew to adulthood. Now, my mom, #8, (pictured in the center above, with the curly hair) and her youngest brother David, #17, are the only two left.

It was hard when Mom last her last sister. There were originally nine, and only three of them were redheads like her. Losing her sisters was hard, but her goal was to live to be the oldest surviving sibling. My Aunt Blanche, the tallest girl pictured above, died on her 86th birthday, so Mom had said she had to live to be 87. I pointed out that she really only had to survive to the day after her birthday to win the “oldest surviving” crown. She will be 88 next month. She’s not necessarily happy about it, as she doesn’t see why she is still here, but it is what it is, and she’s independent and sassy as ever.

Uncle Clarence was something of a patriarch. He was the uncle who stepped in when their oldest sister died of breast cancer, and took in one of her kids. He also was a father figure to one of their oldest sister’s kids, whose parents got divorced due to their father’s alcoholism. He had a big heart and did a lot of things for a lot of people, and was funny as hell. He will truly be missed.

The picture above only shows 12 of the 18 kids. Will, the tallest, was killed in World War II. John, to my mother’s left, was killed when a car fell off the jack while he was working under it, and Edmund, one of the twins in the front, died from accidental carbon monoxide poisoning in his car, after a night of partying. Our family has, like others, seen its share of tragedy, probably more than usual because of how large it is. But as you can tell, we are a family of survivors, and we will plunge on, missing those we’ve lost along the way.

May you all find strength and peace as well.

sewing, sewing patterns, vintage clothing

I found them!

No sooner had I posted the last post about Cut-Ready to Sew week, then I found the five patterns the store would cut for you. These are all Pictorial Review, from 1931.

Pictorial Review 5506, pajamas ensemble of silk shantung. Sold for $7.62.
Pictorial Review 5514, sport ensemble of white shantung. Sold for $5.09.
Pictorial Review 5701, afternoon frock of printed voile. Sold for $1.01
Pictorial Review 5755, town frock of Picardy crepe. Sold for $3.46.
Pictorial Review 5391, play suit of Zephyr print. Sold for 95 cents.

I think I’d buy both the 5506 and the 5701. I love the seams in that dress, but picture myself lounging in those pajamas. Keep in mind that the prices listed included the pattern AND the fabric, and the cutting was done for free. What a deal!

sewing, sewing patterns

Cut-Ready to Sew Week

I was looking around in the newspaper archive, trying to date a Pictorial Review pattern, and came across a fun little article. The week of July 14, 1931, was Cut-Ready to Sew week.

What was this, you ask? This was the week that Pictorial Review offered five different patterns that you could purchase, and the store would cut the fabric for you. Why, you ask? Here was their reasoning:

  1. Beginning sewists could just start sewing, without the intimidation of cutting the fabric.
  2. Experienced sewists who were hesitant to cut fabric could just sew, without the fear.
  3. Expert sewists could consult with the reps to learn shortcuts and new techniques.

Both the patterns and the fabrics were pre-chosen, so the fabric definitely matched the pattern, but also limited choices. I’d love to know how this went over. Personally, I hate cutting, so perhaps it would work out ok for me. I even buy my patterns previously cut, because I hate cutting so much. I’d think that this probably didn’t allow expert sewists to adjust the pattern prior to cutting though, so perhaps it was more appreciated by beginning sewists.

Either way, it was a great marketing technique to get people to use the patterns. Window displays were created with the five dresses and fabrics, to show sewists the final product. I’d love to know what the five patterns were, wouldn’t you?