1950s fashion

Originator Patterns

Originator 416

I was going through a box of patterns a couple of weeks ago, and came across something I’d completely forgotten I had: four Distinctive Originator patterns. Sometimes known as Fashion Originator Patterns, these are one of those rare finds that always make you gasp a little bit.

Not much is known about the company itself. It appears that they were only published from 1948-1951, hence the scarcity. The designs are always very fashion forward. I’ve only come across a couple of other ones in over twenty years of selling patterns. They are, however, always fabulous, though difficult to date because of their rarity. Case in point, the above pattern, and these:

Originator 1286
Originator 1200
Originator 316

One 1948 ad mentions that the patterns were edited by “the style-wise Florence Hort,” although I can’t find any information about her either. Ads mentioned that they were made in limited editions, and in some cases, were only available on order in stores. Often, mention of Originator patterns was in tandem with Modes Royale patterns, which were also more cutting edge. It’s obvious that they were marketed toward fashion forward sewists.

Though they had only shown up in ads in the early summer of 1948, by the end of 1951, no mention of them is made. Perhaps they came before their time, or perhaps they weren’t as popular among every day sewists. If you find one of these now, you will have found a real treasure.

sewing

Fabulous Friday: Swimsuit or Lingerie?

Butterick 9606

I’ve been missing in action lately, I know. I caught a cold from one of the grandgirls, and it escalated into ugliness in the form of asthmatic bronchitis and ear infections. Got over it and the darned kid did it to me again! I’m just starting to get better now, so hang in there — I’ll be back to normal soon, or at least I hope so.

Meantime, look at this pretty pattern. When I first looked at it, I thought it was a super cute swimsuit, but then I read the description — it’s actually lingerie. I think that you could line it and use it as a swimsuit, and it would be a perfect look with that Beach Blanket Bingo vibe. What do you think?

Purchase here. There’s a 15% off sale going on in my shop through the weekend, so take a look at what’s new and stock up.

vintage clothing, vintage fashion

Fabulous Friday: Swimsuit Eye Candy

Dubarry 1485B, mid-1930s.

Today, we are celebrating the warmer weather and coming up spring, so i present to you Du Barry (or Dubarry, depending upon what you like to say) 1485B. It’s from somewhere in the mid-to-late 30s. I thought at first that it was a playsuit, but it’s not — it’s a swimsuit. Isn’t it cute? It’s tiny — a bust 30 — but I love it nonetheless.

Du Barry patterns were sold exclusively at Penney’s, just like Superior patterns were sold at Sears. That’s why you see less of them — you couldn’t find them at your average five and dime store. I find that Du Barry patterns have edgier styles for the era, the envelopes are generally full color, and the illustrations are really nice. Superior tended to have two-color illustrations (usually black on a blue or white envelope) and they were more sensible, rather than trendy fashions. Feel free to prove me wrong!

And with that, I also bring you my all-time favorite swimsuit from the movies: the 1930’s swimsuit Kiera Knightley wore in Atonement (also one of my all-time favorite movies and books). I feel like this swimsuit didn’t get enough notice at the time. And remember swim caps?

Kiera Knightley, in Atonement.

Those little front cut outs remind me of a Fallout Shelter sign, which is perhaps prophetic for the upcoming war. Is this a two piece swimsuit, or is that a modesty panel? Here’s the back.

Kiera Knightley, in Atonement.

Again, look at those details. This movie had SO much great fashion (beyond just the iconic green dress), and I feel like this one got lost in the fray over that gown. I absolutely love it. The white plays off of Kiera’s character’s innocence in everything that happened from this moment on. This swimsuit has so much prophecy in what is to come.

Now I’m going to have to watch the movie again. If you haven’t seen it — DO. Like NOW. Have a great weekend.

1920s fashion, vintage clothing, vintage fashion

Annie Got Her Garter Purse

This is a new thing for me. I came across a pattern from 1916, for a crocheted garter purse. Interesting. I’ve seen garter guns and garter flasks, but an actual purse is new to me.

I found a 1914 article that talks about the “new fad” of garter purses. It mentions it as an alternate to carrying a bag, and different from the custom of tucking one’s cash into one’s stockings — inconvenient and rather scandalous when you need to pull out money in public. The article mentions that they were made in suede, in bright colors like emerald and violet, and consisted of a series of flat pocketbooks attached to a strap, then carefully strapped to one’s leg.

Going back further, a 1905 article talks about how unhygienic putting money into your stocking is, and states that a banking house of the time offered female patrons garter purses, which led to them being made at home. Here is the illustration of the garter purse (left) and the “old way” of putting money into one’s stocking (right):

The one the bank offered ladies had a steel band to hold it in place. Homemade ones had elastic straps, which was considered safer “in the case of a fall or robbery.” Garter purses were advertised as Christmas gifts between girlfriends, and were even sold with powder and powder puffs in two sections, with another section for money to be kept.

The earliest article about garter purses mentions stocking that were made with a chamois pocket to keep valuables in as the first type of garter purse. It wondered if the fad would catch on. It seems to have morphed into the 1905 styles mentioned above, and were commonly used to carry keys, money and valuables. Men tended to marvel at women’s ability to remove money from their garter purses unnoticed. This is because women wore them with slashed skirts and would simply make an excuse to remove themselves momentarily, slip out of sight and get their money out, then return seconds later, cash in hand. Women know how the magic works, don’t we?

A later article from 1920 mentions the unfortunate Mrs. E.M. Lied, who went shopping in Kansas City with her jewels tucked into her garter purse. She arrived home to find that she had unfortunately put the purse on upside down and her jewels had been lost, to the tune of $5000. Lost were a three inch diamond brooch, a platinum lavalliere with three diamond pendants, a fancy dinner ring set with diamonds and Oriental sapphires, and three diamond rings. That’s over $65,000 in value today. Methinks that Mrs. Lied likely took to her bed after this.

It also appears that garter purses did not keep women from being robbed, as bandits grew wise to the fad and would pat women down for them and grab them during a robbery. Moral of the story: don’t carry your valuables with you. Another alternative is a belt wallet, where the wallet attaches inside the belt and rests against your belly, but as for me, I just leave my stuff at home.

1950s fashion, designers, vintage clothing

Fabulous Friday: Goddess

Dovima and the Elephants, 1995, by Richard Avedon.

This may be the first post I’ve done about Dovima, but it most likely won’t be the last, because I. Love. Her. She is truly a goddess, to my eye, and the most iconic model in fashion history, with perhaps the exception of Carmen Dell’Orifice. Actually, she is the most iconic, but Carmen has had a longer career, by virtue of living longer and modelling into her 80s. But Dovima. ::sigh::

Dovima hit the fashion scene in the 40s, and worked into the 60s. She came from an era where models brought their own accessories, shoes and makeup, and did things on the fly. They did their own hair, they did their own makeup, and often the photos were done in any location they could find quickly, especially after a fashion show, when all of the photographers were vying for pictures of the same garment. This is why you will see so many photos of that era outside, where they ran to shoot after a show, or in front of a plain backdrop. It’s some of the most recognizable fashion photography ever done.

The models of that era had an elegance you don’t see now. Dovima was especially so. The way she placed her hands and tilted her head could not be replicated. Her relationship with also-iconic Richard Avedon was muse and mentor, as he considered her one of the last elegant models and she trusted him to capture beautiful images. He shot the unforgettable image above, Dovima and the Elephants, shot at a circus in Paris and featured in Harper’s Bazaar in 1955. The original dress was the first one Yves St. Laurent did for Christian Dior, and it is now housed at Newfields Art Museum in Indianapolis. I have stood and stared at it in awe many times, imagining the scene as Dovima created the image of soft and hard, old and new, elegance and animal instinct. It evokes a lot of emotion for me.

Dovima, for all of her elegance, lived a complex life. Married three times, and the face of both Dior and Balenciaga, she ended up broke in Florida, waitressing at a pizza joint. She had a particular affinity for abusive men, and according to other models of the era, would sometimes arrive at their apartments in the middle of the night, crying about what had been done to her. They wanted to help her, but she always fell back into relationships with the wrong men. She retired from modelling as Camelot crumbled and the mod era arrived, never to be seen on camera again. She died from liver cancer in Florida in 1990, but her images will live forever.

Dovima, by Richard Avedon, 1955.
sewing patterns, vintage clothing, vintage fashion

Centennial Promos

1970 was the 100th anniversary of McCall’s Patterns. To celebrate that milestone event, McCall’s put out a promo ad in its patterns, advertising color prints of Godey’s Lady/s Book illustrations from 1870.

For the unenlightened, Godey’s Lady’s Book was the Vogue of it’s day. It was not actually a book, but instead a monthly magazine published specifically for women. It was published from 1830 to 1878, after which it was sold, continuing to be published as Godey’s Magazine until 1896. It was significant for the scope of its contents, which included poetry, art, and articles, including those about political causes. Its significance cannot be denied, due to its huge readership.

Each issue contained a beautiful fashion illustration in the front, and these are what McCall’s reissued in 1970 for its anniversary. In addition, each issue also included a pattern and instructions for a dress, much like other women’s magazines did later, such as Beldon’s in the UK, Ladies’ Home Journal and McCall’s in the US. Looking at these magazines gives a huge insight into the evolution of fashion.

As far as I can tell, there is no true connection between James McCall and Godey’s, but the flyer for the prints notes that Mr. McCall came over to the US from Scotland in 1870, when he started his pattern company. Perhaps they chose Godey’s prints because they were in the public domain, so the cost of doing the prints would be less than if they paid an artist to do a rendition. Perhaps they chose not to put out historical patterns of 1870 for the centennial because there wasn’t a big revivalist/reenactor movement at the time. They were probably anticipating the 1976 bicentennial revival, so perhaps they didn’t want to jump the gun. Regardless of the reason, they chose some of the most beautiful fashion illustrations of fashion history to print, so it was a nice choice, for those who love fashion and art.

The prints that McCall’s sold for their anniversary were “printed in Italy,” which I suppose made them fancy to women of the day. The printer was in Milan, and was Amicare Pizzi S.P.A. They were done in eight color prints, as opposed to the normal 4 color prints of the day. They were embossed as well and were said to be ready for framing without a mat. They were sold for $2, including postage, which converts to about $13.50 today — a bargain! As far as I know, McCall’s did not do a 150th anniversary promo in 2020. Perhaps they think that putting out their retro reprinted patterns is enough. What do you think?

Take a look at the Godey’s Book illustration examples on Amazon, eBay and Etsy.

vintage fashion

Migraine Alert

Warning: many people who have seen this shirt say it’s triggered migraines.

I’ve been watching the Great British Bake Off, and recently saw Noel in this cool Dries Von Noten Verne Paton shirt. I am mesmerized by it and can’t stop staring at it. It reminds me of the movement-inspired project Iris Van Herpen has been doing. I could look at it for hours.

That being said, it has triggered migraines, so it’s not for everyone. What do you think? Have you seen it on the show? Stills don’t do it justice

vintage fashion

Migraine Alert

Warning: many people who have seen this shirt say it’s triggered migraines.

I’ve been watching the Great British Bake Off, and recently saw Noel in this cool Dries Von Noten Verne Paton shirt. I am mesmerized by it and can’t stop staring at it. It reminds me of the movement-inspired project Iris Van Herpen has been doing. I could look at it for hours.

That being said, it has triggered migraines, so it’s not for everyone. What do you think? Have you seen it on the show? Stills don’t do it justice

embroidery, sewing, vintage fashion

Fabulous Friday: Hieroglyphics

McCall Kaumagraph 1590, undated.

For our viewing pleasure, this Friday I’d like to show you this fantastic Kaumagraph from McCall. There’s no date, but also little doubt that it’s somewhere in the 20s or early 30s. Interestingly, it is stated to be monograms, and if you look at the illustration, each part of the transfer is for a different letter. Is it Chinese, or another Asian language? Is it artistic license? I don’t know, but I love it.

I’ve thought about getting the classic “tattoo of an Asian character,” but decided against it after a friend of mine said her friend got one. She chose the character for “friend,” and then when she met someone Chinese, she was asked why she had a tattoo that said “cow” on her neck. So I guess unless I go to a Chinese tattoo artist, I will hold off. And even if I did, I’d better make sure they like me, lest I end up with “vaccuum cleaner” on my ankle.

If you are interested in this amazing transfer, you can buy it in the shop.