designers, vintage clothing, vintage fashion

Bringing the Extra to Extra

I’ve had this sheet music for a while and have always said that it would look great framed. It’s from the 1944 movie “Lady in the Dark,” and features Ginger Rogers in all her glory. That costume is fantastic.

I saw this post on the Victoria & Albert Museum’s Instagram the other day and it explained why this dress is simply iconic. This costume was designed by Edith Head. She, of course, went on to win eight Academy Awards for costume design. At the time the beauty was designed, it cost $35,000 to make ($15,000 of that was the mink). That equates to about $571,000 today. For ONE dress. It is said to be the most expensive costume in movie history. Ms. Head was right when she said that it simply couldn’t be made today unless a studio gave the costume designer an open wallet. Funny thing is that Ms. Head wasn’t even supposed to be the costume designer for this movie. Valentina was, but Ginger Rogers didn’t like her designs, so they brought in Ms. Head. Serendipitous.

Photo: V & A Museum, Instagram.

What makes it even more amazing is that this was done in 1944 — smack in the middle of wartime. So much for fabric rationing, though the actual amount of fabric is pretty small, but those sequins. WOW. And mink trim and train? Yep. Couldn’t be done today.

Original movie dress and jacket, embellished with faux stones and mink. Photo: Edith Head, by Jay Jorgensen.

Pretty fantastic, huh? It appears that this dress is the sequined version. Two versions were made, according to the book Edith Head: The Fifty Year Career of Hollywood’s Greatest Costume Designer, by Jay Jorgensen. The original dress and matching mink jacket had faux jewels applied to create the shimmering effect, but when Ms. Rogers tried it on, it was too heavy to wear during the dance scenes. They created a second, sequined dress. That dress was worn during the dance scenes, and Ms Head later took it to the fashion shows she would host. The original dress with the stones was shown in two scenes of the movie, then was donated to the Smithsonian, though I haven’t been able to verify that it is still there.

Sequined version of the dress. Photo: Edith Head, by Jay Jorgensen.
vintage clothing, vintage fashion

Fabulous Friday: Swimsuit Eye Candy

Dubarry 1485B, mid-1930s.

Today, we are celebrating the warmer weather and coming up spring, so i present to you Du Barry (or Dubarry, depending upon what you like to say) 1485B. It’s from somewhere in the mid-to-late 30s. I thought at first that it was a playsuit, but it’s not — it’s a swimsuit. Isn’t it cute? It’s tiny — a bust 30 — but I love it nonetheless.

Du Barry patterns were sold exclusively at Penney’s, just like Superior patterns were sold at Sears. That’s why you see less of them — you couldn’t find them at your average five and dime store. I find that Du Barry patterns have edgier styles for the era, the envelopes are generally full color, and the illustrations are really nice. Superior tended to have two-color illustrations (usually black on a blue or white envelope) and they were more sensible, rather than trendy fashions. Feel free to prove me wrong!

And with that, I also bring you my all-time favorite swimsuit from the movies: the 1930’s swimsuit Kiera Knightley wore in Atonement (also one of my all-time favorite movies and books). I feel like this swimsuit didn’t get enough notice at the time. And remember swim caps?

Kiera Knightley, in Atonement.

Those little front cut outs remind me of a Fallout Shelter sign, which is perhaps prophetic for the upcoming war. Is this a two piece swimsuit, or is that a modesty panel? Here’s the back.

Kiera Knightley, in Atonement.

Again, look at those details. This movie had SO much great fashion (beyond just the iconic green dress), and I feel like this one got lost in the fray over that gown. I absolutely love it. The white plays off of Kiera’s character’s innocence in everything that happened from this moment on. This swimsuit has so much prophecy in what is to come.

Now I’m going to have to watch the movie again. If you haven’t seen it — DO. Like NOW. Have a great weekend.