vintage clothing, vintage fashion

College Wardrobe – 1913

I found an article in an old McCall’s Magazine from 1913, listing what a girl should take to college. Interesting, especially given the fact that not that many women went to college, and most of the time, I think their parents did it so the young woman could find herself a husband. But if you’re interested in what Edwardian co-eds packed, here goes.

A medium weight suit that won’t be worn often. Hat and gloves to match, as well as a dressy silk or chiffon waist and half doze whit waists of tailored or lingerie styles. Note that all of these waists, hat and gloves are to go with a suit that they say will be worn only to church or afternoon teas, or for trips into town. The suit would be worn more often if you were in school in a large city.

Plain dresses for wearing to class. Because buildings were better heated than homes, and were close together, gingham and linen was worn later into the fall and earlier in the spring than at home.

“Nine out of ten Freshman” wear one piece or blouses dresses of dark serge or flannel in the winter. They may be embellished with rosettes or ribbon ties. These dresses were worn with cardigans or lightweight coats in spring and fall, with a heavier coat for the winter.

It was not acceptable to wear middy (sailor) blouses or jumpers (sweaters) outside a skirt unless you were on an outing or at an athletic event. They reported that one unnamed student association made a dress code saying a blouse could not be worn outside at chapel, recitations or at the table.

Hats were only worn for dress occasions (with the aforementioned suit), but a simple felt hat was worn in the winter or for walks off campus. They suggested a crochets cap was also welcomed for cold and stormy weather.

Later in the day, style of dress “depends upon the size of your — or your father’s — purse.” Dressing for dinner was the norm, to change out of the dress you’d already worn all day. This was wear the suit-skirt came into play, or gowns from last summer, in light colors in silk, cotton and wool. It was also acceptable to wear white pique or linen skirts with lingerie waists. Just don’t wear your day dress!

Dinner wear or elaborate evening gowns for concerts and other more formal evening events were worn with an evening coat or cap. It is suggested that it should be durable in fabric and color, because it would be worn to everything “from fudge parties to committee meetings.”

One should also pack two or three wash dresses, a couple of simple afternoon dresses — one thin and one thick, and a boudoir cap. Pack a washable kimono for slipping on at the last minute, as well as another for dress up occasions. Kimonos were the rule for hanging out in the dorm, and silk crepe was the best fabric to make one in.

Underwear should be sturdy underwear that can stand up to college washerwomen, in enough quantity so as not to run out if the laundry runs a week behind. A nightgown of better quality, for when the girls drop in — no sleeping in a T shirt in 1913.

Extras: a gym suit and shoes, another kimono for washing, a warm bathrobe, bedroom slippers, a soap box to carry to the tub, percale or seersucker petticoats, high boots, low shoes and pumps, rain boots, umbrella, raincoat and a hot water bottle.

They also remind the reader to start a memory book as soon as they arrive at school, by keeping ticket stubs, programs, invitations, postcards and the like, and to remind family to keep their letters. They suggest making the book from manila paper and brown linen cover, or buy one in the college bookstore. I still have my grandfather’s memory book from his time at West Point. It is one of my most cherished items.

So now you are ready for college. Get packing!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s